Quote
"

The governor launched an attack on the free blacks and slaves of Puerto Rico. On this occasion, he issued the Bando Contra La Raza Negra [Decree against the (Black) Race]. This was a repressive and punitive decree that made no distinction between free Africans and slaves. It was enough merely to be a descendant of Africans to be included in the stipulations of the decree. According to Article I, any offence in which members of the African race, free or enslaved, were involved, would be tried and punished by a military court.

Article II reaffirmed the superiority before the law of the White person over the Black person when it pointed out that any African taking up arms against whites “even if the aggression were justified,” would, if he were a slave, be executed, and if free, would have his right hand cut off.

"

— Baralt, Guillermo A.. “The Bando Contra a Raza Negra and the 1848 Slave Conspiracy in Ponce.” Slave revolts in Puerto Rico: slave conspiracies and unrest in Puerto Rico, 1795-1873. Princeton, N.J.: Markus Wiener ;, 2008. 104-105. Print. (via gelopanda)

(via quisqueyameetsborinken)

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galactic-kat:

wasarahbi:

emes:

leeantsypantsy:

all-aboutqoqo:



“We dressed up as the book Madeline, with six people dressed up as her and me as Ms. Clavel, their teacher. One of the Madelines, however, was the truly special one…the one with the beard, that is. Our experience was hysterical—I’d walk all the girls (and one guy) down the street in two straight lines. Guys would be walking the other way, whistling or hollering at all the pretty ladies. Then, as they got to the back of the line, they’d see my friend Brennan, then they’d see me, and I could tell that they were suddenly wondering if ALL the Madelines were men.”




the last sentence

lmao what

There will never be a time when I don’t reblog this because it is my fave.

galactic-kat:

wasarahbi:

emes:

leeantsypantsy:

all-aboutqoqo:

“We dressed up as the book Madeline, with six people dressed up as her and me as Ms. Clavel, their teacher. One of the Madelines, however, was the truly special one…the one with the beard, that is. Our experience was hysterical—I’d walk all the girls (and one guy) down the street in two straight lines. Guys would be walking the other way, whistling or hollering at all the pretty ladies. Then, as they got to the back of the line, they’d see my friend Brennan, then they’d see me, and I could tell that they were suddenly wondering if ALL the Madelines were men.”

the last sentence

lmao what

There will never be a time when I don’t reblog this because it is my fave.

(Source: moda-pura, via laughtime)

Photo
knowledgeequalsblackpower:

brandieblaze:

jayshana:

midnight-sun-rising:

softjunebreeze:

latinorebels:

Incredibly stupid.



"Indulge your inner Latino"
😒

I don’t even feel as though I have an inner Latino and I have Cuban blood and speak Spanish
White people really be pushing the shits and other white people be like OH YEAH IM CELEBRATING HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH BY SOMEHOW HAVING LATINO INSIDE MEEEE BUT NOT ACTUALLY EDUCATING MYSELF ON THE FUCKED UP HISTORY OF INDIGENOUS LATIN@S (I feel like there is a specific word for that and it’s not coming to me) IN AMERICA OKAY

Them shits don’t even look like they taste accurate. Like, it’s just for a white persob to go “ooooooo, I’m being so exotic. I like extra mild salsa and tacquitos”

Your inner Latino?Really?

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

brandieblaze:

jayshana:

midnight-sun-rising:

softjunebreeze:

latinorebels:

Incredibly stupid.

"Indulge your inner Latino"

😒

I don’t even feel as though I have an inner Latino and I have Cuban blood and speak Spanish

White people really be pushing the shits and other white people be like OH YEAH IM CELEBRATING HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH BY SOMEHOW HAVING LATINO INSIDE MEEEE BUT NOT ACTUALLY EDUCATING MYSELF ON THE FUCKED UP HISTORY OF INDIGENOUS LATIN@S (I feel like there is a specific word for that and it’s not coming to me) IN AMERICA OKAY

Them shits don’t even look like they taste accurate. Like, it’s just for a white persob to go “ooooooo, I’m being so exotic. I like extra mild salsa and tacquitos”

Your inner Latino?
Really?

(via koryminxxx)

Photo
geekygothgirl:

jmiah0192:

Japanese child actress Mana Ashida (little Mako) was embarrassed that she couldn’t pronounce Guillermo Del Toro’s name so he gave her special permission to call him “Totoro-san” instead.
My Neighbor Guillermo Del Toro.

If I don’t reblog this, assume I’m dead.

geekygothgirl:

jmiah0192:

Japanese child actress Mana Ashida (little Mako) was embarrassed that she couldn’t pronounce Guillermo Del Toro’s name so he gave her special permission to call him “Totoro-san” instead.

My Neighbor Guillermo Del Toro.

If I don’t reblog this, assume I’m dead.

(via ruinedchildhood)

Photoset

(Source: bricesander, via laughtime)

Photoset

feministsuperpowers:

kushfampoppy:

sister-sons:

yokhakidfiasco:

sugarcoatedme:

koolthing:

fightblr:

ricrodrigo:

sizvideos:

Video

I thought they put big stencils down and spray painted over them! This blows my mind!

Me too.
Holy shit.

satisfying

I’m so impressed… holy shit…

image

Give these guys a raise… Holy shit.

This is really cool ashit

And their pay grade will fall under ‘unskilled workers’

Throwing shade at capitalism for life.
Photoset

tastefullyoffensive:

This. Is. Ellen Page! [samuelorsaumell]

Photoset

summervirgin:

Look  at them eyes…how could one say no.

(via online)

Photoset

chillona:

gang0fwolves:

I love my skin!

Im gonna cry :’)..

🙊🙊🙊
😭😭😭😭😭YES I LOVE THIS TEACH THE CHILDREN

(Source: arthaemisia)

Photoset
Text

trashypunkers:

Things I Need

  • good skin
  • $$$$$
  • a tall boy that will worship me and tell me i’m pretty 
  • 100 cats

(Source: naughttyangel, via cuddlemedaddy)

Photoset

dauntlesshadowhunterravenclaw:

TACO NEEDS TO KEEP HIS LITTLE MOUTH SHUT 

(Source: mykingdomforapen, via hisprettylittlemiss)

Quote
"I do not desire mediocre love. I want to drown in someone."

shinwus (via bl-ossomed)

(via filesofthestranger)

Photo
quisqueyameetsborinken:

Happy birthday, Lola Rodriguez de Tio!
Lola Rodríguez de Tió, (September 14, 1843-November 10, 1924), was the first Puerto Rican born poetess to establish herself a reputation as a great poet throughout all of Latin America. A believer in Women’s Rights, she was also committed to the abolition of slavery and in the independence of Puerto Rico.
Rodríguez de Tió (birth name:Dolores Rodríguez de Astudillo y Ponce de León) was born in San Germán, Puerto Rico. Her father, Sebastián Rodríguez de Astudillo, was the son of a Venezuelan born father and a mother from San German. He founded the Colegio de Abogados de Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico Law School). Lola’s mother, Carmen Ponce de León, was a descendant of Juan Ponce de León, who was an explorer, and the first Spanish Governor of Puerto Rico. She too was a native of the town of San German. Rodríguez de Tió received her education at home where she was home-tutored. She developed a lifelong love for literature, especially for the works of Fray Luis de León which were to serve her as a source of inspiration. She was very assertive in her early years, at the age of seventeen she demanded to be allowed to wear her hair short, which went against the conventional norm of the time, a personal trademark that she kept through her life.
Rodríguez de Tió moved to Mayagüez, with her family. There she met Bonocio Tió Segarra, whom she married in 1863. Rodríguez de Tió became a writer and book importer who often wrote articles in the local press and was as much of an activist against the Spanish regime as was allowed by the government. After marrying Tió, she published her first book of poetry,”Mis Cantos" which sold the then amazing amount of 2,500 copies.
In 1867 and then again in 1889, Rodríguez de Tió and her husband were banished from Puerto Rico by the Spanish appointed Governors. On their first exile they went to Venezuela and on their second banishment they first moved to New York where she helped José Martí and other Cuban revolutionaries, and later to Cuba, where the couple resided until their respective deaths. Their home became a gathering point for politicians and intellectuals as well as exiled Puerto Ricans. In 1868, inspired by Ramón Emeterio Betances's quest for Puerto Rico's independence and by the attempted revolution called the Grito de Lares, she wrote the patriotic lyrics to the existing tune of La Borinqueña. In 1901, Rodríguez de Tió founded and was elected member to the Cuban Academy of Arts and Letters. She was also an inspector of the local school system. She was well known in Cuba for her patriotic poetry about Puerto Rico and Cuba. Some of Rodríguez de Tió’s best known works are “Cuba y Puerto Rico son…" (Cuba and Puerto Rico are..) and "Mi Libro de Cuba" (My Book about Cuba).
In 1919, Rodriguez de Tió returned to Puerto Rico where she was honored with a great banquet at the Ateneo Puertorriqueño after she recited her “Cantos a Puerto Rico”. Lola Rodríguez de Tió died on November 10, 1924 and is buried at the Colón Cemetery in Havana, Cuba.
It is believed by some that the design and colors of the Puerto Rican Flag, which were adopted in 1954, came from Rodríguez de Tió’s idea of having the same flag as Cuba with the colors reversed. Puerto Rico has honored Lola’s memory by naming schools and avenues after her.

quisqueyameetsborinken:

Happy birthday, Lola Rodriguez de Tio!

Lola Rodríguez de Tió, (September 14, 1843-November 10, 1924), was the first Puerto Rican born poetess to establish herself a reputation as a great poet throughout all of Latin America. A believer in Women’s Rights, she was also committed to the abolition of slavery and in the independence of Puerto Rico.

Rodríguez de Tió (birth name:Dolores Rodríguez de Astudillo y Ponce de León) was born in San Germán, Puerto Rico. Her father, Sebastián Rodríguez de Astudillo, was the son of a Venezuelan born father and a mother from San German. He founded the Colegio de Abogados de Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico Law School). Lola’s mother, Carmen Ponce de León, was a descendant of Juan Ponce de León, who was an explorer, and the first Spanish Governor of Puerto Rico. She too was a native of the town of San German. Rodríguez de Tió received her education at home where she was home-tutored. She developed a lifelong love for literature, especially for the works of Fray Luis de León which were to serve her as a source of inspiration. She was very assertive in her early years, at the age of seventeen she demanded to be allowed to wear her hair short, which went against the conventional norm of the time, a personal trademark that she kept through her life.

Rodríguez de Tió moved to Mayagüez, with her family. There she met Bonocio Tió Segarra, whom she married in 1863. Rodríguez de Tió became a writer and book importer who often wrote articles in the local press and was as much of an activist against the Spanish regime as was allowed by the government. After marrying Tió, she published her first book of poetry,”Mis Cantos" which sold the then amazing amount of 2,500 copies.

In 1867 and then again in 1889, Rodríguez de Tió and her husband were banished from Puerto Rico by the Spanish appointed Governors. On their first exile they went to Venezuela and on their second banishment they first moved to New York where she helped José Martí and other Cuban revolutionaries, and later to Cuba, where the couple resided until their respective deaths. Their home became a gathering point for politicians and intellectuals as well as exiled Puerto Ricans. In 1868, inspired by Ramón Emeterio Betances's quest for Puerto Rico's independence and by the attempted revolution called the Grito de Lares, she wrote the patriotic lyrics to the existing tune of La Borinqueña. In 1901, Rodríguez de Tió founded and was elected member to the Cuban Academy of Arts and Letters. She was also an inspector of the local school system. She was well known in Cuba for her patriotic poetry about Puerto Rico and Cuba. Some of Rodríguez de Tió’s best known works are “Cuba y Puerto Rico son…" (Cuba and Puerto Rico are..) and "Mi Libro de Cuba" (My Book about Cuba).

In 1919, Rodriguez de Tió returned to Puerto Rico where she was honored with a great banquet at the Ateneo Puertorriqueño after she recited her “Cantos a Puerto Rico”. Lola Rodríguez de Tió died on November 10, 1924 and is buried at the Colón Cemetery in Havana, Cuba.

It is believed by some that the design and colors of the Puerto Rican Flag, which were adopted in 1954, came from Rodríguez de Tió’s idea of having the same flag as Cuba with the colors reversed. Puerto Rico has honored Lola’s memory by naming schools and avenues after her.

(via quisqueyameetsborinken)

Video

mamashug:

Celia Cruz performing Sun Sun Babae on Sesame Street 

(via lati-negros)